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IRSG logoJust in case you missed it, here are details of the latest issue of Informer, which came out on Sunday. As usual, lots of good stuff, with a variety of  book reviews this time. For further details see the Informer website. Or if you fancy becoming a contributor, get in touch!

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In case you missed it last time (since it filled up pretty quickly), there’s another chance to catch my full-day designing search tutorial in London on May 25. I’ll be presenting a full day course called Search Usability: Filters and Facets, which focuses on faceted search and provides deeper coverage of the key topics along with a variety of new practicals and group exercises.

It’s also very competitively priced from just £180 per person – contrast that with a rate of ~£659 a day for this comparable offering!

For further details and registration, see the UKeIG website. In the meantime, I’ve appended further details below.

Hope to see you there!

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Uncle_Sam_(pointing_finger)

And finally… here’s the third installment of my trilogy of posts on the information retrieval challenges of recruitment professionals. The background to this (in case you missed the previous two) is that a few months ago I published a post describing our InnovateUK-funded research project investigating professional search strategies in the workplace. As you may recall, we surveyed a number of professions, and the one we analyzed first was (cue drum roll)… recruitment professionals.

It’s a profession that information retrieval researchers haven’t traditionally given much thought to (myself included), but it turns out that they routinely create and execute some of the most complex search queries of any profession, and deal with challenges that most IR researchers would recognize as wholly within their compass, e.g. query expansion, optimization, and results evaluation.

What follows is the final post summarizing those results. In part 1, we focused on the research methodology and background to the study. In part 2, we discussed the search tasks that they perform, how they construct the search queries and the resources they use. Here, we focus on how recruiters assess and evaluate the results of their search, and their views on the features of an ideal search engine. The published paper can be downloaded from Sage journals (Russell-Rose, T and Chamberlain, J. “Searching for talent: The information retrieval challenges of recruitment professionals”. Business Information Review, March 2016, vol. 33 no. 1 40-48).

As usual, comments and feedback are welcome – particularly so from the recruitment community who are best placed to interpret and contextualize these findings.

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Here’s a sample of some of the things we’re working on at UXLabs this year, neatly packaged into Masters level ‘internships’. I use quotes there as it’s a convenient term used by many of my academic colleagues, but these opportunities are (a) unpaid and (b) remote (i.e. hosted by your own institution). So perhaps ‘co-supervised MSc projects initiated by a commercial partner’ is more accurate term… Anyway, what we offer is support, expertise, supervision and access to real world data/challenges. If you are interested in working with us on the challenges below, get in touch. Continue Reading »

textmining

I received a pleasant surprise in the post today: my personal copy of Text Mining and Visualization: Case Studies Using Open-Source Tools, edited by Markus Hofmann and Andrew Chisholm. Now I don’t normally blog about books, since as editor of Informer there was a time when I would be sent all manner of titles for inspection and review. But I’ll make an exception here. This is partially since Chapter 7 is my own contribution (on mining search logs), as discussed in my earlier blog posts. This is complemented by 11 other chapters, covering a variety of topics organised into four sections:

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Uncle_Sam_(pointing_finger)

Better late than never… here’s the long-delayed follow up to my original post on the information retrieval challenges of recruitment professionals. The background to this (in case you missed the first post) is that a few months ago I published a post describing our InnovateUK-funded research project investigating professional search strategies in the workplace. As you may recall, we surveyed a number of professions, and the one we analyzed first was (cue drum roll)… recruitment professionals.

It’s a profession that information retrieval researchers haven’t traditionally given much thought to (myself included), but it turns out that they routinely create and execute some of the most complex search queries of any profession, and deal with challenges that most IR researchers would recognize as wholly within their compass, e.g. query expansion, optimization, and results evaluation.

What follows is the second in a series of posts summarizing those results. In part 1, we focused on the research methodology and background to the study. Here, we focus on the search tasks that they perform, how they construct the search queries and the resources they use.

As usual, comments and feedback are welcome – particularly so from the recruitment community who are best placed to provide the insight needed to interpret and contextualize these findings.

Continue Reading »

IRSG logoJust in case you missed it, here are details of the latest issue of Informer, which came out on Sunday. As usual, lots of good stuff, with a variety of  book reviews this time. For further details see the Informer website. Or if you fancy becoming a contributor, get in touch!

Continue Reading »

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