Feeds:
Posts
Comments

I know the official publicity may not have reached your inbox just yet, but here’s a sneak peek at this year’s lineup for Search Solutions 2016. For those unfamiliar with the event, it is described as:

… the premier UK forum for presentation of the latest innovations in search and information retrieval. In contrast to other major industry events, Search Solutions aims to be highly interactive, with attendance strictly limited. The programme includes presentations, panels and keynote talks by influential industry leaders on novel and emerging applications in search and information retrieval.

As last year we’ll be preceding the event with a tutorials day on November 29, which will offer conference attendees and local participants a stimulating and informative selection of practical training courses reflecting current topics and state-of-the-art methods in search and information retrieval. More on that later! Meanwhile, here is the provisional programme thus far:

IRSG logoJust in case you missed it, here are details of the latest issue of Informer, which came out on this week. As usual, lots of good stuff, with news of the IRSG Search Industry Awards this time. For further details see the Informer website. Or if you fancy becoming a contributor, get in touch!

Continue Reading »

irsgI know the official publicity may not have reached your inbox just yet, but here’s a sneak peek at something we’ve been working on in the IRSG that I’m really excited about: the IRSG Search Industry Awards. As you may know, for many years the IRSG has awarded prizes to its members in various forms, e.g. the Karen Sparck Jones award, best paper at ECIR, etc. These awards help create a sense of community and provide recognition to individual members for their work.

However, the current awards programme is aimed almost exclusively at researchers, with little recognition given to practitioner contributions. This is despite the fact that the BCS as a whole is primarily a professional organisation and the majority of IRSG members are practitioners. The IRSG Search Industry Awards aim to address this disparity.

Continue Reading »

After a brief hiatus, I’m pleased to say that we will shortly be relaunching the London Text Analytics meetup. As many of you know, in the recent past we have organized some relatively large and ambitious events at a variety of locations. But we have struggled to find a regular venue, and as a result have had difficulty in maintaining a scheduled programme of events.

What we really need is a venue we can use on a more regular schedule, ideally on an ex-gratia basis. It doesn’t have to be huge – in fact; a programme of smaller (but more frequent) meetups is in many ways preferable to a handful of big gatherings.

Continue Reading »

Last week I had the pleasure of presenting the keynote talk at the Supporting Discovery of Archival Collections: Challenges and Opportunities workshop, held at Wellcome Trust in London. The day was a thoroughly enjoyable mix of presentations and discussions and I learned a great deal. Many thanks to Paul Clough and his fellow organizers Paula Goodale (Sheffield University), Chris Hilton (Wellcome Trust), Sarah Higgins (Aberystwyth University) and Pauline Rafferty (Aberystwyth University). There are plans to produce a paper summarising the workshop findings which I very much look forward to seeing. In the meantime, the slides from my own talk are appended below, titled “Designing the Search Experience: The Language of Discovery”.

Continue Reading »

Logo_CERI16As promised, here is the second instalment of our paper on search strategy formulation, which Andy MacFarlane presented at 4th Spanish Conference in Information Retrieval in Granada last week. Andy has been teaching IR and search strategies for many years, and this paper represents a synthesis of his framework and my research insights. It describes a structured way to think about search strategy development and (hopefully) offers some valuable advice on how best to teach such skills. As always, comments & feedback welcome!

Continue Reading »

Logo_CERI16Regular readers of this blog will know that over the past few months I’ve been researching professional search strategies in the workplace as part of an InnovateUK-funded research project. A fortuitous side effect of that is the following paper, which is the output of a collaboration with Andy MacFarlane of City University London. Andy has been teaching IR and search strategies for many years, and this paper represents a synthesis of his framework and my research insights. The paper itself is due to be presented at 4th Spanish Conference in Information Retrieval in Granada next week. I hope Andy won’t mind too much if I describe the work as slightly more academic than my usual blog posts, but it does offer a structured way to think about search strategy development and offers some valuable advice on how best to teach such skills. For now, here is just the first half. You’ll have to wait till next week for the second instalment!

 

ABSTRACT

Healthcare information professionals perform systematic literature reviews to gather the evidence needed to answer specific research questions and formulate policy. However, performing a systematic review is a resource-intensive and time consuming undertaking, often taking years to complete. Moreover, the output relies heavily on the quality of the initial search strategy in ensuring that the scope is sufficiently exhaustive and not biased by easily accessible studies. In this paper we introduce a structured methodology and a framework for learning which together aim to embody best practices from the community and provide support for many of the common issues in search strategy development.

Continue Reading »