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Posts Tagged ‘Design Patterns’

In case you missed it last time (since it filled up pretty quickly), there’s another chance to catch my search usability tutorial in Edinburgh on April 24. I’ll be presenting a full day course called Search Usability: Filters and Facets, which focuses on faceted search and provides deeper coverage of the key topics along with a variety of new practicals and group exercises.

It’s also very competitively priced from just £170 per person – contrast that with a rate of ~£659 a day for this comparable offering!

For further details and registration, see the UKeIG website. In the meantime, I’ve appended further details below.

Hope to see you there!

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CHI 2013

Just a quick heads up that on Thursday 2nd May I’ll be presenting a tutorial at CHI 2013 in Paris called Designing Search Usability. This is part of a programme of training courses offered throughout the conference week, so there are lots more to choose from. Personally I wouldn’t mind attending the Speech-based Interaction course as well.

The course represents a wholesale revision of my original tutorial, updated to accommodate new concepts and exercises drawn from the book “Designing the Search Experience: the Information Architecture of Discovery”, published by Morgan Kaufmann in December 2012.

It’s also very competitively priced at just 20 euro per session (although it appears this rate is only available to conference attendees). For further details and registration, see the CHI 2013 website. In the meantime, I’ve appended further details below.

Hope to see you there!

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I’m guessing that by now most people may have seen this, but just in case – and for the record – here is the official announcement of the publication of Designing the Search Experience: the Information Architecture of Discovery. It’s the product of almost two years effort by Tyler and me, so we’re both relieved and elated to finally see it in print.

I’ve appended a brief summary below. If you’d like to see more – including a free sample chapter – check out the book website. If you’re interested in reviewing it, drop me a line.

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designing-the-search-experience_largeRemember the Yahoo! Directory? It was a hand-built taxonomy that allowed users to browse and discover Internet resources. By categorizing sites by topic and location, it became the definitive map of the World Wide Web. But at the turn of the millennium, Yahoo! transformed itself from a directory into a search engine. The task of organising so many disparate items into a single coherent structure had simply become too overwhelming.

A decade later, this story is all too familiar. Online stores sell hundreds of thousands of items, social networks host millions of users, and Flickr hosts billions of photos. Navigation is no longer the future: search is the key to sense-making in the digital universe.

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Last week I announced the line-up for Search Solutions 2012, to be held at BCS London on November 29. But this year we’re also offering a Tutorial Programme, which will run the day before (November 28). This year’s programme consists of four half day-tutorials:

  • 09:30-12:30 MapReduce Algorithms in Information Retrieval, (Dr. Dell Zhang, Birkbeck, University of London)
  • 09:30-12:30 Patent Searching and Landscaping (Dr. John Tait, johntait.net ltd.)
  • 14:00-17:30 Applications of Text Processing (Dr. Michael Oakes, University of Sunderland
  • 14:00-17:30 Designing Search Usability, (Dr. Tony Russell-Rose, UXLabs)

I’ve appended further details of my tutorial below. Full details of pricing and registration will be available on the Search Solutions website shortly. Hope to see you there!

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Just a quick heads up that on October 18 I’ll be presenting a tutorial at CILIP in London on Search Usability: Filters and Facets. This is a new course offered as part of the UKeiG’s training programme (so new in fact I haven’t completed it yet 🙂 It builds on my existing Designing the Search Experience course, extending it to include deeper coverage of key topics and a variety of new practicals and group exercises. (It’s also very competitively priced from just £160 per person – contrast that with a rate of ~£500+ per day for this comparable corporate offering!)

For further details and registration, see the UKeIG website. In the meantime, I’ve appended further details below.

Hope to see you there!

Course Outline:

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Here are the slides from the talk I gave at Enterprise Search Europe last week on A Taxonomy of Site Search. This talk extends and validates the taxonomy of information search strategies (aka ‘search modes’) presented at last year’s event, and reviews some of their implications for design. But this year we looked specifically at site search rather than enterprise search, and explored the key differences in user needs and behaviours between the two domains.

As usual, some of the builds don’t come out quite right on Slideshare, but I can always make the ppt available if people want to see the original.

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In the previous post we looked at techniques to help us create and articulate more effective queries. From auto-complete for lookup tasks to auto-suggest for exploratory search, these simple techniques can often make the difference between success and failure.

But occasionally things do go wrong. Sometimes our information journey is more complex than we’d anticipated, and we find ourselves straying off the ideal course. Worse still, in our determination to pursue our original goal, we may overlook other, more productive directions, leaving us endlessly finessing a flawed strategy. Sometimes we are in too deep to turn around and start again.

Conversely, there are times when we may consciously decide to take a detour and explore the path less trodden. As we saw earlier, what we find along the way can change what we seek. Sometimes we find the most valuable discoveries in the most unlikely places.

However, there’s a fine line between these two outcomes: one person’s journey of serendipitous discovery can be another’s descent into confusion and disorientation. And there’s the challenge: how can we support the former, while unobtrusively repairing the latter? In this post, we’ll look at four techniques that help us keep to the right path on our information journey.

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I’ve been thinking recently about the role of ‘advanced search’, i.e. the practice whereby some sites withhold certain aspects of functionality from ‘standard’ search and accommodate them instead within a separate search experience. Now, there’s a longer story to the rationale and value in doing this (which I’ll cover in a subsequent post), but it reminded me of the following presentation which addresses the issues of audience segmentation and personalization more generally. In particular, it describes an attempt to develop a framework for understanding the various types of personalization seen online and define them in terms of their fundamental characteristics.

To test it we applied it to a few notable instances to see where they would fit. The outcome revealed personalization types that could exist in theory, but don’t in practice – which of course starts you wondering why. I should point out that the ‘research’ behind this was relatively modest, so it’s by no means the final word, but it’s interesting food for thought (until I get round to writing a proper piece on ‘advanced search’ 🙂

Related Posts:

  1. From Search to Icon Design: a grammar for visual communication
  2. A Taxonomy of Enterprise Search
  3. Design Patterns for Spatial Information Visualisation and Analytics Applications
  4. User Interface Design Patterns for Search & Information Discovery
  5. Search UI Design Patterns

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Last week I announced the line-up for Search Solutions 2011, to be held at BCS London on Weds November 16. But this year, for the first time, we’re also offering a Tutorial Programme, which will run the day before (November 15). This year’s programme consists of two half day-tutorials:

You can register for either or both tutorials, and there is a discount available if you register for Search Solutions at the same time. Jun Wang will be providing further details of the first tutorial on his blog, and I’ve appended further details of mine below. Full details of pricing and registration are available on the Search Solutions website. Hope to see you there!

Overview

This tutorial explores the fundamental concepts and principles of User-Centred Design for information search and discovery and demonstrates how to apply them in a range of practical contexts. Participants will learn how to differentiate between various types of search behaviour, develop an understanding of the key dimensions within the search user experience, and discover how to apply UI design patterns to commercial search applications. The session concludes with a group exercise applying these skills to a range of practical design challenges.

Objectives

The aim of this tutorial is to deliver a learning experience grounded in good scholarship, integrating the latest research findings with insights derived from the practical experience of designing and optimizing an extensive range of commercial search applications.  It focuses on the development of transferable, practical skills that can be learnt and practiced within a half-day session.

Benefits

Participants in this tutorial will:

  • Explore the fundamental concepts and principles of Human-Centred Design for information search and discovery
  • Study models of human information-seeking behavior and how to apply interaction design principles based on those models
  • Learn how to differentiate between various types of search behaviour: known-item, exploratory, lookup, learning, investigation, etc. and understand how they may be combined to form composite search strategies and patterns
  • Develop an understanding of the key dimensions of user type, goal, context and mode of interaction, and how to apply these dimensions when designing for different user contexts
  • Understand the role of design patterns, and how to apply UI design principles and patterns from various libraries in designing search user interfaces
  • Gain an awareness of the key design resources available within the HCIR community and how to apply these to practical design challenges

Audience

  • Information architects and user experience designers
  • Developers and managers of search projects
  • IR researchers and other search specialists interested in the designing more effective user experiences for information retrieval and discovery

Structure

This half-day tutorial is structured as follows:

  1. Introductions and objectives
  2. Understanding Search & Discovery Behaviour
  3. Varied Solutions for Varied Contexts
  4. Faceted Navigation & Search
  5. UI Design Pattern Libraries
  6. Group Exercise: UX Review
  7. Group Exercise: UX Review (Feedback & Presentations)
  8. Conclusions & Wrap-up

NOTE: to get the best out of this tutorial, participants should bring an Internet-enabled laptop.

Instructor

Tony Russell-Rose is founder and director of UXLabs, a consultancy specialising in user experience research, design and analytics. Before founding UXLabs he was Manager of User Experience at Endeca and editor of the Endeca UI Design Pattern Library, a resource dedicated to best practice in the design of search and discovery experiences. Prior to this he was technical lead at Reuters, specialising in advanced user interfaces for information access and search. And before Reuters he was Group Manager at Canon Research Centre Europe, where he led a team developing next generation information access products and services. Earlier professional experience includes a Royal Academy of Engineering fellowship at HP Labs and a Short-term Research Fellowship at BT Labs.

His academic qualifications include a PhD in human-computer interaction, an MSc in cognitive psychology and a first degree in engineering, majoring in human factors. He also holds the position of Honorary Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Interactive Systems Research, City University, London. He is currently vice-chair of the BCS Information Retrieval group and chair of the IEHF Human-Computer Interaction group.

Related Posts:

  1. Search Solutions 2011: lineup announced!
  2. Search Solutions 2010: Reactions & Reflections
  3. Designing the Search Experience (tutorial at ECIR 2010)
  4. ECIR Industry Day – lineup announced
  5. Search Solutions 2010: Topics & Titles

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